Global Accessibility Awareness Day 2018

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Please mark 17 May 2018 to celebrate Global Accessibility Awareness Day! #gbla11yday

Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) is an awareness day, focusing on accessibility, often emphasising on web accessibility. (SOURCE: Wikipedia)

Apple has a tremendous initiative of hosting the Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) in their Retail stores and offices around the world. It organises its series of events to raise awareness, to educate public on accessibility, and to host invited guests from the PWD community to share their stories/experiences at the Apple Apple Orchard Retail store (270 Orchard Road). #todayatapple #appleorchardroad

Details as follows:

Date: Friday, 18 May
Time: 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Lily Goh is the founder of ExtraOrdinary Horizons, a social enterprise that teaches sign language and provides public services. Lily is a seasoned artist who performs song-signing and mallet percussion.

To register: https://www.apple.com/…/music-lab-lily-goh-6400782977525515…

Date: Sunday May 20
Live Art: Figures and Caricatures with Isaac Liang
Time: 4:00pm – 6:00pm
Join deaf illustrator Isaac Liang for Global Accessibility Awareness Day and learn about his journey around the world, sketching and painting with iPad Pro. He’ll share the fundamentals of figure drawing. Then you’ll get hands-on with iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, using lines and colour to create your own caricatures. The session will be facilitated by a sign language interpreter.

To register: https://www.apple.com/…/live-art-isaac-liang-6398202376968…/
Interested to know more about Apple products? Do check out the schedules below:

Date: Tuesday May 15
Basics: Using iPad and iPhone with Hearing Loss
Time: 3:30pm – 4:30pm
To register: https://www.apple.com/…/using-ipad-and-iphone-with-hearing…/

Date: Friday May 18
Basics: Using iPad and iPhone with Hearing Loss
Time: 5:00pm – 6:00pm
To register: https://www.apple.com/…/using-ipad-and-iphone-with-hearing…/

Date: Sunday May 20
Basics: Using iPad and iPhone with Hearing Loss
Time: 2:00pm – 3:00pm
To register: https://www.apple.com/…/using-ipad-and-iphone-with-hearing…/

For the full line-up of GAAD events at the Apple Orchard Retail store, you can check them out at this link: https://www.apple.com/…/collection/accessibility-collection/

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A New Makeover of 2018!

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This website got its new makeover at the same domain this year!
There are changes in our workshops and courses. The cost remains the same till the end of this year. You can check it out.

As some of you have been to the Peninsula Shopping Centre for the workshops, courses and other activities, we would like to inform you that we will no longer occupy there with effect from 16 April 2018. We do not have any physical or permanent location. For our workshops and courses, we try our best to book classrooms at Blk 261, Waterloo Street (Nearest MRT: Bras Basah MRT, Exit A) for our workshops and courses.

Look out for our MailChimp updates!

#throwback: SDEA Theatre Arts Conference 2017

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I had always wanted to share my learning experiences about this event, and finally I posted this blog entry today!

I was the only Deaf participant there, with the sign language interpreter accompanying me for 2 full days. I consider myself as the art practitioner in Deaf ways, and I’m exploring different possibilities for my future Deaf Singapore Theatre. In the meantime, I’m the trainee with Project Tandem led by Mr. Peter Sau. If you wish to know more about this project, you may check this link out.

For the first time, I came to know different methodologies, research and experiences from hearing practitioners. I remember that Dr. Julie Dunn’s concept of children’s dramatic play was popular among the participants. I had no chance to attend her session at that time. Her studies has shown that the concept could possibly contribute to imagination, creativity, language development and narrative skills. Technology should not be included in it.

I remember two sessions by Ms. Nazreen Osman, and Ms. Kang Chee Hui (from SACSS) respectively. Ms. Nazreen shared her experiences on integrating drama into her school’s English Language curriculum/syllabus. This was quite eye-opening to me, though it may be common to the others. Ms. Kang got her students to showcase their performance about how social media affects relationships among the students.

After I learnt about the conference, I feel that there are some possibilities to apply the “mainstreamed/hearing” tools in Deaf ways…

What do I mean by the Deaf ways of theatre arts? These ways revolve around sign language that is visual and gestural. Yet linguistics. This could have similarities with mime or physical theatre. Beyond that, it adopts visual vernacular that is “a theatrical art form of physical expression, storytelling with strong sense of body movements, iconic signs, gestures, and facial expressions” (Ishtiaq, 2016).

At this moment, Mr. Peter mentors me for his project. I learnt many new things from his team, and I have been grateful since then.

 

DISCLAIMER: The author of the above article is the founder & director from ExtraOrdinary Horizons, and she is bilaterally profound-severe Deaf. All opinions expressed herein are thus the personal views of contributing individual authors. They are not indicative of any endorsement, political or otherwise, or lack thereof, either on the part of the organisation.

Sharing my experience in Deafine Your Horizons Event

27th May 2017, 3pm-7pm, Star Vista Shopping mall 

This one-day event, Deafine Your Horizons, was our first collaboration with a group of Hwa Chong Institute (HCI) students which aims to raise awareness about ExtraOrdinary Horizons at Star Vista shopping mall. HCI student set up booth activities, such as learning to sign Numbers 1-20, and getting others to try lip reading while wearing headphones with music to simulate how some Deaf feel when they cannot hear us speak. This also showed how lip-reading is a skill that can be hard to learn and may not be always be accurate as some words form same shape on the lips. It is like trying to differentiate “I love you” from “colourful” only through lip-reading . These two sentences can sound different, but they form similar shapes. So the lip-reading has its own limitations too.  This event also provided a platform for OriLove, which is founded by young Deaf Entrepreneurs, to sell their handmade merchandise.

It’s a heartfelt experience for me to see our audience trying and learning to sign with us during song signing and signing alphabets. Being on stage alone is something I am not used to. It’s the connection with this group of audience through their zealous participation through the games and song signing and the support from my friends that gave me the courage to do my best in song signing on stageOne of the audience said that he cried when Lily Goh song signed the song,  “If You Were In My Shoes”.  The lyrics in this song is written by Lily Goh (& Hina Liang), and the music and video production is made by Audris Ho and many other people credited in this link below. Listen to it here.  When I first listened to this song, I was also moved to tears as it reminded me of how one of deaf friends which I am close to felt. I am a hearing myself, so I do not really understand how it feels to be Deaf in this world. So, it really warmed my heart when I saw the audience embracing Deaf culture and learning to signing along with us. So, it is in hope that more events can be organised to promote Deaf culture, to support Deaf entrepreneurship, to learn sign language, and to bridge the gap between Deaf and Hearing.

 

DISCLAIMER: The author of the above article is a volunteer with ExtraOrdinary Horizons. All opinions expressed herein are thus the personal views of contributing individual authors. They are not indicative of any endorsement, political or otherwise, or lack thereof, either on the part of the organisation.

Subscribe to Arjun’s YouTube channel


We’re pleased to share the YouTube channel of our volunteer, Arjun. He posted his first video, to celebrate the International Day of Cultural Diversity today.

“The day provides us with an opportunity to deepen our understanding of the values of cultural diversity…”
SOURCE: United Nations

You may wonder why Deafness is part of culture. Generally, you have a common knowledge that Deafness is a hidden disability. We, the members of the Deaf communities around the world, see Deafness as our Deaf Culture. Sign Language is the heart of the Deaf Culture. Also, we view it as our deafhood that we experience since our birth or early discovery. Here in Singapore, we do have our Singapore Sign Language that is called “SgSL” in a short form. You can know more about SgSL.

We advocate to protect our identity, culture, language and pride in our Deaf Culture. We prefer to be called “a big D Deaf” as proudly identified within this culture. Why do many people call us “hearing impaired“? This “hearing impaired” label is often used in a medical or audiological view. We are not comfortable with this derogatory label as we do not live with our problems in hearing sounds or conversations every day (or most of the times). Have you ever listened to us with a open mind and heart? Since very young, we have been fitting ourselves to a mainstreamed society upon our parents’ wish or hope that we could behave like them. Their “hope” is derived from a lack of knowledge and understanding on Deafness. Compared to other countries where a strong Deaf culture has its long history (more than 100 years), Singapore is quite young. We struggle with poor accessibility in arts, access, education, employment and technology for many years. Though Singapore signed the UNCRPD in 2012, there have been slight improvements in our Deaf issues and needs. Now, we hope to improve our needs for a better future, especially for our younger deaf generations.

Today, we encourage you all to embrace cultural diversity.

DISCLAIMER: The above article is written by Lily Goh, a deaf advocate. All opinions expressed herein are thus the personal views of contributing individual authors. They are not indicative of any endorsement, political or otherwise, or lack thereof, either on the part of the organisation.